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Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) is committed to providing new and innovative treatments for our cancer patients whenever possible. This includes enrolling qualified patients in carefully selected clinical trials for cancer. Clinical trials are a key testing ground for determining the effectiveness and safety of new treatments and drugs for cancer and other diseases. Our doctors may recommend that cancer patients enroll in cancer clinical trials if they meet specific criteria. Cancer trials may offer patients access to treatment options that would otherwise be unavailable to them. Talk to your doctor about whether a cancer trial is a good option for you and ask about the risks and various requirements involved. Use the tool below to find a CTCA® clinical trial for your cancer type.

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76 Clinical Trials

     

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This randomized phase II clinical trial studies how well nivolumab after combined modality therapy works in treating patients with high risk stage II-IIIB anal cancer.

     

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This phase III trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin given with or without nab-paclitaxel work in treating patients with newly diagnosed biliary tract cancers that have spread to other places in the body.

     

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This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.

     

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The purpose of this study is to evaluate the activity of SAR439859, a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective estrogen receptor (ER) inhibitor that belongs to the selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD) class of compounds in comparison with other endocrine treatments approved for the treatment of breast cancer, including fulvestrant, selective ER modulators (tamoxifen), and AIs (anastrozole, exemestane, and letrozole).

     

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This is a Phase IB/II, two-stage, open-label, multicenter study to determine the efficacy and safety of durvalumab + paclitaxel + novel oncology therapies (i.e. therapies designed for immune modulation) and durvalumab + paclitaxel alone as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC).

The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab vsersus placebo in combination with neoadjuvant (pre-surgery) chemotherapy and adjuvant (post-surgery) endocrine therapy in the treatment of adults who have high-risk early-stage estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+/HER2-) breast cancer.

     

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This randomized, phase II/III trial studies how well standard-of-care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard-of-care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated.

     

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This is an open-label, three-part, multiple-dose study to evaluate safety, tolerability and efficacy of U3-1402 in patients with HER3-positive metastatic breast cancer.

     

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This is a randomized, 2-arm, Phase 3, open-label, multicenter study to compare the safety and efficacy of trastuzumab deruxtecan versus the physician's choice (2:1) in HER2-low, unresectable and/or metastatic breast cancer participants.

     

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clinicaltrials.gov

This randomized phase III trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with or without carboplatin work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide are more effective when followed by paclitaxel alone or paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating triple-negative breast cancer.