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Lung cancer

Lung cancer survival statistics and results

When you learn you have lung cancer and begin looking for treatment options, you may be concerned about life expectancy and quality of life. At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), we believe you have the right to know our statistics for lung cancer treatment outcomes, so you can make informed decisions about your cancer care.

Each person's cancer diagnosis is as distinct as the person it affects. Part of our promise to you and your family is to offer clear information, and powerful and thorough treatment options, all based on your individual needs.

Many cancer patients consider length of life and quality of life to be two of the most important statistics for lung cancer care, and they value a treatment experience that is as convenient and stress-free as possible. As part of our commitment to educating patients and their families, we provide our lung cancer results in these areas. 

Non-small cell lung cancer survival statistics and results

At CTCA®, we understand that you may want to see information regarding the survival results of patients with distant (or metastatic) non-small cell lung cancer who were diagnosed and/or at least initially partly treated at our hospitals to help you and your family decide where to go for treatment, as part of many other factors you may be considering. Therefore, we asked an independent biostatistician to analyze the survival results of CTCA patients.

Statistical methodology and limitations
Qualifications of the independent researchers

The chart below reflects the CTCA and SEER survival rates for non-small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2015. It includes estimates of the percentage of non-small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease who survived for six months to five years after the initial diagnosis, as recorded in the CTCA and SEER databases.

  • This analysis included non-small cell lung cancer patients from CTCA who had primary tumor sites (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+) from C340 to C343 or from C348 to C349, were diagnosed from 2000 to 2015 (including 2000 and 2015) and received at least part of their initial course of treatment at CTCA. All patients included in the analysis were considered analytic patients by CTCA.
  • Non-small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease from the SEER database and non-small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease from the CTCA database were included in the analysis. In addition, the analysis excluded patients whose medical records were missing any of the following information:
    • SEER Summary Stages
    • Primary tumor sites
    • Cancer histologic types
    • Date of initial diagnosis
    • Age at initial diagnosis
    • Gender
    • Race

lung non small cell cancer survival rate

*The SEER data represent national results over a large number of institutions and have been included for illustrative purposes. They are not intended to represent a controlled study and/or a perfect analysis of the CTCA data because of variability in the sample sizes of the two databases, the clinical condition(so) of the patients treated, and other factors.

The CTCA sample is relatively small because only metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who had been initially diagnosed at CTCA and/or received at least part of their initial course of treatment at CTCA were included. These factors significantly reduced the size of the CTCA sample, which means that the estimates reflected in the survival chart may be subject to high variation and may not be replicated in the future when we have a larger CTCA sample for analysis.

For a full, technical explanation of the methodology used in the analyses and a detailed description of the CTCA and SEER patient groups included, click here to view statistical methodology, and for more information about the SEER program, go to seer.cancer.gov.

We also want to be sure you understand that cancer is a complex disease and each person's medical condition is different; therefore, CTCA makes no claimes about the efficacy of specific treatments, the delivery of care, nor the meaning of the CTCA and SEER analysis. Not all cancer patients who are treated at a CTCA hospital may experience these same results.

Small cell lung cancer survival statistics and results

The chart below reflects the CTCA and SEER survival rates for small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2015. It includes estimates of the percentage of small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease who survived for six months to five years after the initial diagnosis, as recorded in the CTCA and SEER databases.

  • This analysis included small cell lung cancer patients from CTCA who had primary tumor sites (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+) from C340 to C343 or from C348 to C349, were diagnosed from 2000 to 2015 (including 2000 and 2015) and received at least part of their initial course of treatment at CTCA. All patients included in the analysis were considered analytic patients by CTCA.
  • Small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease from the SEER database and small cell lung cancer patients with distant disease from the CTCA database were included in the analysis. In addition, the analysis excluded patients whose medical records were missing any of the following information:
    • SEER Summary Stages
    • Primary tumor sites
    • Cancer histologic types
    • Date of initial diagnosis
    • Age at initial diagnosis
    • Gender
    • Race

lung cancer survival rate

*The SEER data represent national results over a large number of institutions and have been included for illustrative purposes. They are not intended to represent a controlled study and/or a perfect analysis of the CTCA data because of variability in the sample sizes of the two databases, the clinical condition(so) of the patients treated, and other factors.

The CTCA sample is relatively small because only metastatic small cell lung cancer patients who had been initially diagnosed at CTCA and/or received at least part of their initial course of treatment at CTCA were included. These factors significantly reduced the size of the CTCA sample, which means that the estimates reflected in the survival chart may be subject to high variation and may not be replicated in the future when we have a larger CTCA sample for analysis.

For a full, technical explanation of the methodology used in the analyses and a detailed description of the CTCA and SEER patient groups included, click here to view statistical methodology, and for more information about the SEER program, go to seer.cancer.gov.

We also want to be sure you understand that cancer is a complex disease and each person's medical condition is different; therefore, CTCA makes no claims about the efficacy of specific treatments, the delivery of care, nor the meaning of the CTCA and SEER analysis. Not all cancer patients who are treated at a CTCA hospital may experience these same results.

Quality of life results

The mission of CTCA is to be the home of integrative and compassionate cancer care. We never stop searching for and providing powerful and innovative therapies to heal the whole person, improve quality of life and restore hope.

Cancer and its treatment may have a major impact on your life. How well you feel—emotionally and physically—during and after treatment may affect your ability to fulfill your role in the family, to continue working and to participate in activities you enjoy. At CTCA, we recognize that treating cancer means treating the whole person, not just the cancer itself. 

For that reason, CTCA patients self-report their symptoms and quality of life interference issues using a symptom assessment tool that patients are invited to complete throughout their treatment. Findings from these assessments are used in creating personalized care plans.

See our quality of life results

Patient experience: CTCA versus state and national averages

CTCA partners with Press Ganey®, a third-party administrator of surveys, to assess the experience and satisfaction of CTCA patients who receive care at each of our five centers. We are committed to open and transparent communication about our ability to meet and exceed our patients' needs and expectations. Both Inpatient—also known as HCAHPA (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems)—as well as Outpatient experience scores are available.

CTCA hospitals and other U.S. hospitals administer HCAHPS surveys to a random sample of adult patients every month between 48 hours and six weeks after their inpatient discharge. Hospital results are then reported on the HHS Hospital Compare website. HCAHPS scores for all participating hospitals were updated by HHS in April 2015, representing patients treated in 2013. CTCA is proud to report that, as of the April 2015 update on the Hospital Compare website, our hospitals received a five-star rating—scoring among the top 7 percent of hospitals nationwide.

In efforts to present more timely data, see our patient experience results provided directly by Press Ganey

Quality and patient safety program 

Our patients are at the center of our stakeholders' hearts, minds and actions, every day. Integral to this promise is our commitment to quality and patient safety. 

The need for a comprehensive Quality & Patient Safety Plan is critical to the mission of CTCA. Quality does not simply happen—it is built and nurtured. Quality is the outcome of a set of consciously designed processes and systems that begins and ends with people. 

CTCA is committed to measuring the quality of the care it provides, continuously improving its care and demonstrating its mission to provide integrative and compassionate cancer care.

See our various metrics inclusive of Quality and Patient Safety Program results