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Leon Yoder, DO, FACP

Gastroenterology Fellow Director & Gastroenterologist

Southwestern Regional Medical Center

Video: Dr. Leon Yoder

Dr. Leon Yoder

Osteopathic Medical Degree

  • Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine

Internship / Residency

  • Internal Medicine - Veterans Hospital, Dayton, OH

Fellowship(s)

  • Gastroenterology - University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver

Certification(s)

  • American Board of Internal Medicine
  • Gastroenterology - American Association of Physician Specialists

Practicing Since: 1977

The opportunity to spend more time with patients drew Dr. Leon Yoder to CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center.

As Gastroenterology Fellow Director and a gastroenterologist, Dr. Yoder says it’s incredibly important to him to have ample time to focus on his patients’ needs, listen to and address their concerns, carefully consider all of their ailments and work with other specialists to provide the most complete care to each patient.

“We want to make sure that we take care of our patients in every way possible.” Dr. Yoder stresses, and also feels that spending considerable time with patients builds their confidence in the treatment they’re receiving, and in themselves.

The gastroenterologist, who concentrates his practice on the treatment of patients with all types of GI issues, including bile duct and pancreatic cancers, says the prospect of offering new and innovative treatments also attracted him to CTCA.

He’s especially excited to initiate a new treatment for bile duct cancers—photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT uses a laser or other light source combined with a light-sensitive drug to target and destroy cancer cells. Currently, PDT is used to treat esophageal cancers. Dr. Yoder says that the treatment may soon be an option for bile duct cancer patients at Southwestern. He also performs over 1,000 endoscopy and colonoscopy procedures yearly.

Board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Association of Physician Specialists in gastroenterology, Dr. Yoder is also a member of American College of Physicians and the American Association of Physician Specialists.

Dr. Yoder earned an osteopathic medical degree from Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine. He then completed a residency in internal medicine at Veterans Hospital (which is affiliated with Ohio State University), in Dayton, Ohio. In addition, he completed a fellowship in gastroenterology at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver.

Currently, he is the program director for a gastrointestinal (GI) fellowship training program at Oklahoma State University.

For 25 years, Dr. Yoder practiced gastroenterology at Saint Francis Hospital and Broken Arrow Medical Center in the Tulsa area. He also served on executive committees and was Chief of Staff for two years at Broken Arrow Medical Center.

Dr. Yoder is an adjunct clinical associate professor of medicine at Oklahoma State University. He has been an instructor for family practice residents in the In His Image program. The residency program teaches physicians to provide spiritual care along with medical care.

He has published on the subject of gastrointestinal hormones, while his latest research is on the potential impact of lifestyle modifications on GI cancers. The research, which he is conducting along with a group of CTCA colleagues, assesses whether factors such as diet, smoking cessation, exercise, meditation and no alcohol intake help to prevent GI cancers. Additionally, the research looks at the effects of such lifestyle modifications on patients receiving ongoing treatment for GI cancers.

For 15 years, Dr. Yoder volunteered monthly at an indigent care clinic providing medical care to families who do not have insurance.

Family means the world to Dr. Yoder. In fact, he might even say that family is the best medicine. His wife is a nurse, who now takes care of their grandchildren. He has four grown children (two are physicians) and nine grandchildren.

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