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CTCA in the news

Cancer and Nutrition

Ketogenic diet and calorie restriction show promise in improving cancer outcomes but clinicians say more research is needed.

Cancer and Nutrition

Ketogenic diet and calorie restriction show promise in improving cancer outcomes but clinicians say more research is needed.

CTCA Launches Head and Neck Cancer Program

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern) has launched a comprehensive head and neck cancer program to serve patients with cancers of the oral cavity, throat, larynx, nasal cavity, salivary gland, thyroid, and skin of the head and neck.  Esteemed surgical oncologist Carol Bier-Laning, MD, FASC, has joined CTCA to lead the program, which will offer innovative new treatment options and integrative care to patients.

CTCA Launches Head and Neck Cancer Program

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern) has launched a comprehensive head and neck cancer program to serve patients with cancers of the oral cavity, throat, larynx, nasal cavity, salivary gland, thyroid, and skin of the head and neck.  Esteemed surgical oncologist Carol Bier-Laning, MD, FASC, has joined CTCA to lead the program, which will offer innovative new treatment options and integrative care to patients.

Local cancer survivor urges others to visit Cancer

Berlin native Bonnie Foy can enjoy endless summer days and nights camping cancer-free thanks to the help she received from Cancer Centers of America.

Foy, who was diagnosed with cancer two years ago, went to the Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, Ill. for treatment. She said she was amazed at the quality of care provided at the center.

Local cancer survivor urges others to visit Cancer

Berlin native Bonnie Foy can enjoy endless summer days and nights camping cancer-free thanks to the help she received from Cancer Centers of America.

Foy, who was diagnosed with cancer two years ago, went to the Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, Ill. for treatment. She said she was amazed at the quality of care provided at the center.

Nurses throughout U.S. use honey to treat wounds

Patrice Dillow, RN, MSN, CWOCN, APRN, wouldn’t blame others for questioning honey’s place among the ranks of antibiotics, anti-inflammatories and other medications used to promote healing in clinical settings. But Dillow, a wound care specialist at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, Ill., said many of those questions often disappear as quickly as the pain, odor and other effects of the persistent, open wounds Dillow regularly uses honey to treat while helping oncology patients.

Libertyville doctor joins Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Jonathan Kiev, MD, FACS, of Libertyville, recently joined the ranks of doctors at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern). As an innovative thoracic surgeon specializing in advanced and minimally invasive surgical procedures to treat cancers of the lung, he will treat lung cancer patients as well as perform surgery to treat esophageal cancer and tumors involving mediastinal structures.

Libertyville doctor joins Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Jonathan Kiev, MD, FACS, of Libertyville, recently joined the ranks of doctors at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern). As an innovative thoracic surgeon specializing in advanced and minimally invasive surgical procedures to treat cancers of the lung, he will treat lung cancer patients as well as perform surgery to treat esophageal cancer and tumors involving mediastinal structures.

Nurses throughout U.S. use honey to treat wounds

Patrice Dillow, RN, MSN, CWOCN, APRN, wouldn’t blame others for questioning honey’s place among the ranks of antibiotics, anti-inflammatories and other medications used to promote healing in clinical settings. But Dillow, a wound care specialist at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, Ill., said many of those questions often disappear as quickly as the pain, odor and other effects of the persistent, open wounds Dillow regularly uses honey to treat while helping oncology patients.

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