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CTCA in the news

The Emergence of Survivorship Programs

From Yahoo Voice

Author Brandi Walker

The Emergence of Survivorship Programs

Ten years ago, cancer survivorship programs were almost unheard of at hospitals. Now with more cancer survivors living longer, these programs are becoming more commonplace, including at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® hospitals.

CTCA hosts 10th annual Chefs for the Cure

CTCA Executive Chef Kenny Wagoner promoted the 10th annual Chefs for the Cure event which benefits Susan G. Komen Tulsa. Chef Kenny also demonstrated a recipe for Blackened Salmon “Scallop” with Smoked Corn Maque Choux.

Defining Leadership in the GI Field: 2 Gastroenterologists Discuss Their Strategies

My personal philosophy on how to approach leadership in the gastroenterology field is consistent with American College of Gastroenterology's mission to advance the field of clinical gastroenterology through education and research. By far, these are the two most important areas of focus. In addition to education and research, in order to lessen the gaps relating to treatment, protocol and patient care, there are other areas that can help move the bar. Collaboration amongst physicians both within and outside of the GI discipline is vital. We can learn a lot from stepping outside of our own clinics. The sharing of knowledge and patient cases is absolutely invaluable.
 
We as practitioners need to encourage new ideas and innovation. We must create an environment where everyone we work with feels empowered to foster and share ideas. The more we allow the mind to expand and explore possibilities, the greater the potential for incredible breakthroughs. We must challenge ourselves and those around us to look at things differently. Often thinking from the perspective of what the patient sees, experiences or believes opens new pathways for advancement.
 
We must also initiate and support quality measures. In an earlier Becker's ASC Review article I discussed benchmarking as a means to improve colonoscopy quality. Quality measures are vital to our ability to deliver the most current and reliable information and modes of care to all of the key audiences, including patients, accrediting organizations and licensing bodies. Without the continual review of what we are delivering and how we are delivering it, we can easily become complacent and fall behind in the care we are providing.
 
It is important to lead by example. The Indian political and spiritual leader Mahatma Gandhi said it best when he stated, "Be the change you want to see in the world." It is important to be consistent with how we interact with our patients and with our colleagues. Seek out audiences that are open to hearing what we have to share. Be both a teacher and student. The most accomplished individuals in any discipline are able to incorporate this into their personal and professional lives. Publish as much as you can. There is a thirst for knowledge and information in science; the more we contribute, the stronger we grow as a discipline. Allow others to see us in action, and ask to see them in action. Learning by example is very powerful.
 
And finally, great leaders always take the time to plan. When incorporating any of the above into how you approach leadership in gastroenterology, focus your thinking and create achievable short term and long term strategic goals.

Healthy eating can help cancer patients during and after treatment

Dr. Simeon Jaggernauth, a medical oncologist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, said people being treated for cancer need to eat well because their bodies need good building blocks for repair after radiation, chemotherapy or surgery. CTCA patient Todd Gillett and Executive Chef Kenny Wagoner are also quoted.

Wonderful dishes all for a good cause

CTCA Executive Chef Kenny Wagoner demonstrates a recipe that he plans to serve at the upcoming Chefs for the Cure event which will benefit Susan G. Komen Tulsa.

7 Gastroenterologists on Benchmarking & Colonoscopy Quality

Pankaj Vashi, MD, Lead National Medical Director, National Clinical Director of Gastroenterology/Nutrition, Metabolic Support and Gastroenterology, Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Zion, Ill.: Benchmarking as a means to improve colonoscopy quality plays a vital role in being able to deliver the most current and reliable information and modes of care to all of the key audiences, including patients, accrediting organizations and licensing bodies.

The best benchmarks for colonoscopy quality are adenoma detection rate and cecal intubation rate. ADR is defined as the average percent of patients with polyps who have been screened through colonoscopy over the age of 50. The rate has to be greater than 25 percent in males and greater than 15 percent for females. The other quality measured is the cecal intubation rate. This is the time the colonoscope is withdrawn back through the colon, carefully examining the lining from cecum to rectum. The current benchmark for this is a minimum of six minutes. At Cancer Treatment Centers of America®, we use cecal intubation rate as a quality measure. We benchmark this by documenting the number of patients in whom cecum was reached during colonoscopy.

The future of medicine will continue to challenge us to document quality of care so that all parties that use this information are kept well informed. But most important of all is the benefit it will have for the patients that we serve.

Laughter can provide some surprising benefits

Cancer Treatment Centers of America is starting to adopt laughter therapy as a tool to help cancer patients. The center’s website says that Dr. Katherine Puckett introduced laughter therapy to the Midwestern Regional Medical Center when a patient asked for it. Now laughter clubs or humor groups are led at CTCA to help patients and families heal. Laughter therapy is based on the physical exercise of laughing, so patients start by just making “ha-ha” or “he-he” sounds until they start laughing. Puckett says “it is hard for people not to join in because laughter is so contagious.” One of the things she is finding is that patients learn to laugh. Their situation is not very funny but they can still laugh and feel better. When you laugh, it’s hard to concentrate on anything negative.

Laughter can provide some surprising benefits

Cancer Treatment Centers of America is starting to adopt laughter therapy as a tool to help cancer patients. The center’s website says that Dr. Katherine Puckett introduced laughter therapy to the Midwestern Regional Medical Center when a patient asked for it. Now laughter clubs or humor groups are led at CTCA to help patients and families heal. Laughter therapy is based on the physical exercise of laughing, so patients start by just making “ha-ha” or “he-he” sounds until they start laughing. Puckett says “it is hard for people not to join in because laughter is so contagious.” One of the things she is finding is that patients learn to laugh. Their situation is not very funny but they can still laugh and feel better. When you laugh, it’s hard to concentrate on anything negative.

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