Cancer Treatment Centers of America

We're available 24/7
(800) 615-3055

Chat online with us

Chat now

Other ways to contact us

Video
chat
Have us
call you
(800) 615-3055

Have questions? Call (800) 615-3055 to speak to a cancer information specialist.
Or we can call you.

CTCA in the news

9 Ways to Help a Grieving Loved One

From P&G Everyday

Author Heather Chaet

9 Ways to Help a Grieving Loved One

Debbra Gossen, RN, OCN, GMS from Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center joins other grief experts in the discussion on how to help a grieving loved one.

The Driving Force Behind Dr Jeffrey Weber

They say you don't really know cancer until the disease affects you personally, and for Jeffrey Weber, M.D., it's been a personal journey getting to know and fighting the disease. In 2005, the Cancer Treatment Centers of American doctor lost his own daughter, Annie, to sarcoma when she was just 24 years old.

"The feeling of helplessness is profound and can only be, to a small degree, countered by dedication of your mind, talents and emotion to doing everything you can to help others who find themselves in a similar situation."

Survival mode: Cancer fighter, Blue Devils photographer will be honored

In 2014, Holly Barrett, a 39-year-old Kenosha, Wisconsin native, found a lump in her breast. After going in for a mammogram, she learned nothing had been detected. Yet as time went on, the lump began to grow and she continued to worry. In September 2014, Barrett was sent by her employer, Hewlett-Packard, to fix some office equipment at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® at Midwestern Regional Medical Center. During this routine visit, she began asking some questions and scheduled an appointment. Shortly thereafter, Barrett was diagnosed with breast cancer and had both breasts removed and 33 doses of radiation. Now, she focuses on educating others to listen to their bodies.

Latinos Need Sun Protection, Too

Those of us with darker complexions think skin cancer isn’t something we have to worry about. Not so, says Dr. Patricia Thompson, cancer specialist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

CTCA Awarded Five-Star Quality Rating

Cancer Treatment Centers of America Global (CTCA) announced that four of its five hospitals, including the Tulsa hospital (CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center), were awarded Five-Star quality scores - the highest possible rating – by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS). Richard Haldeman, president and CEO of the Tulsa hospital, and Dr. Daniel Nader, chief of staff of the Tulsa hospital, were quoted.

Wichitan embraces life while controlling cancer

In 2009, Jesse Thomas from Wichita Falls, Texas was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma. After undergoing treatment, the cancer recurred four years later. By that point, Jesse was told that he would need to undergo experimental treatment or live with the diagnosis. That’s when Jesse chose to seek a second opinion at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern).

Is Laughter the Best Medicine?

Several studies have been performed to determine the benefits of laughter. Some reported benefits include a reduction of stress and pain. This article takes you on a journey through the history of laughter therapy. In addition, Dr. Katherine Puckett, National Director of Mind Body Medicine at Cancer Treatment Centers of America®, shares how laughter therapy can help patients undergoing cancer treatment.

Lindenhurst nurse receives DAISY Award from CTCA

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® at Midwestern Regional Medical Center has honored Catherine Pippin, RN, with The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses in recognition for her commitment and patient-centered approach to care. The award is part of the DAISY Foundation’s program to recognize the super-human efforts nurses perform every day.

The LinkedIn for Cancer

Researchers have often wondered why a drug that failed for virtually all test patients will trigger a miraculous recovery for a tiny sample during some drug trials. The answers may lie in DNA, and with new genome-sequencing technologies it may soon be possible to pinpoint genetic mutations and other molecular abnormalities that play a role in some patients’ astounding recoveries.

Dr. Glen Weiss, director of clinical research and Phase I and Phase II clinical trials at Cancer Treatment Centers of America and a clinical associate professor at the Translational Genomics Research Institute in Phoenix, has also treated patients whose cancer took an unexpected trajectory.

Hospitals
HOSPITALS
Cancer Types
CANCER TYPE
Our Doctors
OUR DOCTORS
INSURANCE
INSURANCE