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Cancer Center Newsletter

We understand how overwhelming it can be when you or your loved one is coping with cancer.

The Cancer Center Newsletter was developed to ease some of the burden of this "information overload," by featuring various topics in an easy-to-understand format.

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Past Newsletters

November 2016 - The science behind the gender differences in cancer

Men and women are different in many ways, from the organs in their bodies to the emotions they wear on their sleeves, even in how they approach an argument or take on a task. So it may come as little surprise that cancer—a disease influenced by genetics, biology and lifestyle habits—affects men and women differently, too. The question that still stumps scientists is: Why?

October 2016 - Getting schooled: Four lessons learned from breast cancer
For one doctor, few cancers are as strict a teacher about the disease as breast cancer. He learned key lessons from treating breast cancer that have contributed to his understanding the nature of other cancers and how to better treat patients.
September 2016 - New guidelines help doctors and patients with chronic pain management
Pain is one of the most common symptoms of cancer and its treatment, and if left unmanaged, experts say it may have serious impacts on patients’ quality of life and may even delay or disrupt treatment.
August 2016 - Cell Wars: How rogue cells build their cancer empire
Like a villain in a certain science-fiction movie, some of our body's cells turn to the dark side. Usually, rogue cells recognize they have turned evil and shut themselves down before they cause damage. Others are quickly killed by the immune system. But some rogue cells find ways to survive. When that happens, a cancer may be born.
July 2016 - Prostate Cancer: Know your options
Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer found in U.S. men, after skin cancer. It is a challenging disease because it often comes with no warning signs or symptoms until it progresses to advanced stages. If you or a loved one is diagnosed with prostate cancer, one of the first things you can do is educate yourself about the disease and available treatment options.