Cancer Treatment Centers of America

We're available 24/7
(800) 615-3055

Chat online with us

Chat now

Other ways to contact us

Video
chat
Have us
call you
(800) 615-3055

Have questions? Call (800) 615-3055 to speak to a cancer information specialist.
Or we can call you.

CT scan for colorectal cancer

What is a CT scan?

Computed tomography (CT) scan (also known as a computed axial tomography scan, or CAT scan) is one of the most commonly used tools for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

A CT scan is an X-ray procedure that uses a computer to produce three-dimensional, cross-sectional images of inside the body. Unlike conventional X-rays, CT scans provide exceptionally detailed images of the bones, organs and tissues. X-rays are taken from many angles and combined to create a cross-sectional image.

During a CT scan, a patient rests on a table and slides into a large tunnel-shaped scanner. Some exams require a contrast dye to be injected into a vein before the procedure. This helps certain areas show up better on the images. The procedure is painless and typically takes a few minutes.

A CT scan may be used to pinpoint the location of a tumor, evaluate the extent of cancer in the body, and assess whether the disease is responding to treatment. In some cases, CT technology is used to accurately guide cancer treatment during a procedure.

CT scan medical animation

Video: CT Scan Medical Animation

Medical animation

CT scan for colorectal cancer

CT scans of the chest, abdomen and pelvis are taken to allow doctors to see detailed images of the colon and rectum, as well as the lungs, liver and other organs. The scans help doctors stage the cancer. CT scans should be taken prior to and at various points throughout colorectal cancer treatment, as the tests help gauge whether treatment is working.

Your browser (Internet Explorer 7) is out of date. Learn how to update your browser.