Hyperthermia for breast cancer

What is hyperthermia?

Hyperthermia (which means “elevated temperature”) damages or destroys cancer cells by raising the tumor temperature to a “high fever” range, similar to the way the body uses fever naturally when combating other conditions.

During a hyperthermia treatment, the cancerous tumor is heated to a temperature between 40 and 45°C (104 -113° F) for a certain period of time. Since cancer cells can’t tolerate high temperatures as well as healthy cells, parts of the cancer cells can become damaged by the heat.

Hyperthermia can be used with radiation therapy, chemotherapy and biotherapy/immunotherapy.

This may be a promising treatment option for patients with advanced or recurrent cancer.

Advantages of hyperthermia for breast cancer

Breast cancer hyperthermia helps make breast cancer cells more vulnerable to the effects of other treatments, like breast cancer radiation therapy and certain chemotherapy drugs.

Our radiation oncologists typically uses hyperthermia to treat superficial breast tumors located within a few centimeters from the surface of the body.

Hyperthermia is also a promising option if you have advanced or recurrent breast cancer, as the treatment may help to improve your quality of life after breast cancer radiation therapy.

Your browser (Internet Explorer 7) is out of date. Learn how to update your browser.